PTSD stories
from our community

Read featured PTSD stories from our community then contribute your own to build a better picture and understanding of post traumatic stress disorder.

Photo used with permission by member Dani Eason, see the story here.

Understanding and
overcoming PTSD

 

Everyone experiences these issues differently as there’s such a large spectrum of causes and severity when struggling with post traumatic stress disorder. That’s why we believe in the power of stories and using therapeutic photography to help people open up and break the silence as a way to better understand these mental health issues for ourselves and everyone else.

 

Community insights on PTSD

Darkness

We see visually and through member’s words that PTSD also represents a darkness within their minds that is often avoided.

Internal Prison

Members speak about PTSD as if feeling like they’re stuck or trapped within their minds or bodies and the reactions to triggers.

Numb

Members also speak about feeling emotionally numb in their stories of PTSD. 

An example of using the visual metaphor for silence and feeling imprisoned to
represent the experience or symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder, by member Trena Wall. See the story.

PTSD Symptoms

 

Post traumatic stress disorder will often disrupt your normal routines and functioning by having sounds, words, or certain situations triggering the past trauma, which can lead to the following symptoms that fall under 4 categories:

1) Intrusion

  • flashbacks feeling like you relive the same event again and again
  • frequent nightmares about the traumatic event
  • vivid, unpleasant memories of the traumatic event
  • intense mental or physical distress when thinking about the traumatic event

2) Avoidance

  • avoiding people, places, or situations that remind you of the traumatic event

3) Arousal and reactivity

  • bouts of anger
  • difficulty concentrating
  • startling easily and having an exaggerated response
  • feeling on edge constantly
  • irritability

4) Cognition and mood

  • negative thoughts about yourself
  • distorted feelings of guilt, worry, or blame
  • reduced interest in activities you once loved
  • trouble remembering important parts of the event

PTSD stories from member Dani Eason, representing her post traumatic stress disorder
in a photograph with darkness. See the story.

Stories about PTSD we’re requesting

 

PTSD Stories Priority Status
Stories of overcoming PTSD High Open
PTSD flashbacks High Open
PTSD diagnosis High Open
What does PTSD look like High Open
What does PTSD feel like High Open
What does PTSD do to the body High Open
How does PTSD feel High Open
How does PTSD develop High Open
Typical PTSD thoughts High Open
Dealing with PTSD High Open
Dealing with PTSD in children High Open
Dealing with PTSD at work High Open
Dealing with PTSD during exams High Open
Dealing with PTSD attacks High Open
How to deal with PTSD High Open
How to get rid of PTSD High Open
How to talk about PTSD High Open
Understanding someone with PTSD High Open
What causes PTSD High Open

How photography can help with PTSD

 

  1. The act of taking photos can be a form of mindfulness, and shares many of the same practices or principles, which can help to calm and focus the mind
    .
  2. PTSD can be overwhelming — which makes it hard to put into words what it feels like, especially for someone who has never experienced it before. Using non-verbal communication through photos allows people to expand their vocabulary to convey what they are going through. In the example above, we have blurred movement, which is a common theme we see from members to help convey post traumatic stress disorder.
    .
  3. More and more studies are showing the benefits of being out in Nature to help relieve anxiety, stress, and depression. For many people, photography provides more of a motivation to get outside in Nature on a regular basis and explore new areas.

 

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